phototoyo:

Superkilen

phototoyo:

Superkilen

Reblogged from phototoyo with 7 notes

mindyourgarden:

The Ravelijn “Op den Zoom” Bridge (Bergen Op Zoom, The Netherlands)

In former days, the Ravelijn was supplied from the city with small rowing boats. The concept of the bridge is, to let the bridge follow the original track of these boats, so the bridge echoes the former route the boats followed from the city to the fortress. That is why the bridge snakes across the water to the fortress.

In winter the bridge can be pulled to the side, so there can be ice-skated around the fortress.

The deck of the bridge is convex to let the bridge blend in with the water and the surroundings. No mirror image in the water and as close to the water as possible. The stairs at the jetty near the fortress can move up and down (and stay horizontal) with the water level.

The bridge is made completely to the principles of the Cradle to Cradle philosophy. Air-filled polyethylene pipes positioned underneath the timber surface help keep the bridge afloat, without requiring any additional structural framework. The decking is made of Accoya, a high-performance wood product, which is treated to improve its ability to resist fungal decay, and the effect of swelling and shrinkage that could result from its proximity to water.

by RO&AD Architects

Reblogged from mindyourgarden with 275 notes

odesenho:

Institute for Forestry and Nature Research | Behnisch Architekten

odesenho:

Institute for Forestry and Nature Research | Behnisch Architekten

Reblogged from odesenho with 51 notes

wonderingalex:

THIS.IS.IT.

Reblogged from wonderingalex with 422 notes

northwich-z:

That wall…

northwich-z:

That wall…

Reblogged from northwich-z with 7 notes

northwich-z:

Well this is just awesome…

Reblogged from northwich-z with 5 notes

thefabulousmsm:

The Running Wall Residence

Dolls do you get caught up running around too much? Well don’t get stuck alongside a wall! Just grab your favorite Ken and live behind one!

The Running Wall Residence is a house in Kerala, India.

The wall is laterite, a building stone but per se not something with which the natural stone branch might occupy itself.

It is a waste product of granite or basalt e.g. exposed to tropical climate for extended periods at the end of which often pronounced shades of red ensue. It is sometimes dense enough to use as a building stone but definitely easy to mine which is why it is the material of choice for low-cost building.”

Would you live in The Running Wall Resdience? Or just run alongside the wall?

Barbie thinks you’d do both!
Enjoy!

Kisses, m.

Reblogged from thefabulousmsm with 4 notes

biosphere2:

Every year during Milan Design Week, the vibrant city plays host to design stars (and hopefuls) from around the world. Check out some of the best “green” designs from the final days of Milan Design Week: http://inhabitat.com/best-green-designs-from-the-final-days-of-milan-design-week/

biosphere2:

Every year during Milan Design Week, the vibrant city plays host to design stars (and hopefuls) from around the world. 
Check out some of the best “green” designs from the final days of Milan Design Week: http://inhabitat.com/best-green-designs-from-the-final-days-of-milan-design-week/

Reblogged from biosphere2 with 7 notes

culturalcurrents:

These Algae Farms Cover The Walls Of Buildings And Soak Up Carbon

Urban farming meets plankton.

Walls might be the next frontier for urban farming. Though rooftop gardens are fairly common, exterior walls aren’t typically used for growing crops. A “green wall” usually means a covering of plants that won’t be harvested.
But while a wall isn’t necessarily a good place for vegetables, with algae, it’s another story. One new algae-filled wall comes from Italian architect Cesare Griffa, who designed a system that can quickly grow and harvest micro-algae to help fight climate change and create new products.
Read more at FastCoExist

culturalcurrents:

These Algae Farms Cover The Walls Of Buildings And Soak Up Carbon

Urban farming meets plankton.

Walls might be the next frontier for urban farming. Though rooftop gardens are fairly common, exterior walls aren’t typically used for growing crops. A “green wall” usually means a covering of plants that won’t be harvested.

But while a wall isn’t necessarily a good place for vegetables, with algae, it’s another story. One new algae-filled wall comes from Italian architect Cesare Griffa, who designed a system that can quickly grow and harvest micro-algae to help fight climate change and create new products.

Read more at FastCoExist

Reblogged from culturalcurrents with 8 notes

mothernaturenetwork:

World’s tallest living wall takes hydroponics to new heightsEmployees at Desjardins Group headquarters in Quebec can breathe easier (and have something gorgeous to gawk at during lunch) thanks to a new 15-story vertical garden.

mothernaturenetwork:

World’s tallest living wall takes hydroponics to new heights
Employees at Desjardins Group headquarters in Quebec can breathe easier (and have something gorgeous to gawk at during lunch) thanks to a new 15-story vertical garden.

Reblogged from mothernaturenetwork with 677 notes

gettliffearchitecture:

A striking example of a straw bale house in the mountains of southern Colorado. Designed by boulder architects Gettliffe Architecture. 

Straw bale building offers unique design opportunities, with the use of natural materials and a relatively sustainable construction process. We love straw bale for its thermal stability (high mass and insulation value), compostability, and the fact that it is often a locally available agricultural byproduct.

Reblogged from gettliffearchitecture with 89 notes

verdeveil:

How to build a green roof. Construction of green roof in Big Sur California

  1. Architectural Construction
  2. Waterproofing Membrane
  3. Root Barrier Plastic Sheeting
  4. Rigid Roof Insulation
  5. Drainage Mat
  6. Filter Fabric / Water Retention Cups
  7. Engineered media (soil) specific to plant type and location for low profile roof vegetation
  8. Vegetation

Green Roof design by Habitat Gardens, Pacific Grove Ca and Fred Ballerini Horticulture. Building this green roof sparked the Verde Veil concept pages :)

Reblogged from verdeveil with 5 notes

digitalspark:

Great ‘green’ design at the recent Epcot garden show at Walt Disney World.

digitalspark:

Great ‘green’ design at the recent Epcot garden show at Walt Disney World.

Reblogged from digitalspark with 3 notes

verdeveil:

Vertical Green Wall @ Palo Alto Library, Ca

Vertical green wall designed for Palo Alto Library by Group 4 Architecture

in collaboration with the GSky Vertical Wall System was implemented into the sustainable strategy slated for a LEED Platinum building for the City of Palo Alto.

Reblogged from verdeveil with 23 notes

thefabulousmsm:

Palm Beach House by Vaughn McQuarrie

Barbie loves a great beach place but she’s quite intent on variety in her architecture, not her taste in men… Kens! She’s quite happy with her taste in Kens! And she knows that her favorite types of Ken love a dream house on the beach! Want to impress your Ken’s, dolls? Snag a beachy pad like this one!

The house is located on a reasonably steep bush covered site a few hundred meters up a valley from the golden sands of Palm Beach Waiheke Island.


Sitting under a large pohutukawa tree the house negotiates the site with a series of suspended internal and external spaces connected by external bridges and stairs. The owners of this home have to step outside in order to circulate from room to room. Due to difficult access and the wish to minimize waste, the design was based around factory sheet sizes which could be carried by hand and directly fixed in place without the need for cutting. Glue laminated timber was used extensively in the framing, once again carried in by hand and pieced together on site. (Via/Archdaily/photos: © Simon Devitt)

Would you love this beach house?

Barbie thinks you might!
Enjoy!
Kisses, m

Reblogged from thefabulousmsm with 2 notes